Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) in Children



About Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL)

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (also called acute lymphocytic leukemia, or ALL) in children is cancer of the blood that starts in the bone marrow and spreads to the bloodstream. Leukemia starts in the bone marrow, the spongy internal part of bones where new blood is made. The term leukemia comes from Greek words for white and blood, because ALL affects white blood cells.

Leukemia develops because of a mutation in a white blood cell that causes it to multiply uncontrollably. These mutated white blood cells, called “blasts” take over the bone marrow and crowd out normal blood cells. One blast soon generates billions of other blasts, with a total of about a trillion leukemia cells typically present in the body at the time of diagnosis.

ALL is the most common children’s cancer, accounting for 25% of all cancers in children under the age of 15. There are over 3,000 new cases of ALL diagnosed in children and adolescents (0-19 years old) in the United States each year.

News About Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) in Children was last modified: January 6th, 2016 by Geoff Duncan
12-Year-Olds Fall in Love While Fighting Cancer

12-Year-Olds Fall in Love While Fighting Cancer

A hospital can often be a cold, sterile place, and probably the last place you’d expect to find love. That’s especially true if you’re just 12-years-old. But Stella Usiak and Lucas Lowe have found a very special friendship while both fighting a very serious disease.

read more
Becca Mueller, Biphenotypic Acute Leukemia

Becca Mueller, Biphenotypic Acute Leukemia

7 Years Old at Diagnosis In July 2010, 7 year old independent, over-achieving Becca Mueller had a continually high fever. Her family took her to the doctor, who ordered a blood test revealing elevated white blood cell counts. Further testing confirmed what... read more

Pin It on Pinterest

test