Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) in Children



About Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML)

Acute myeloid leukemia (also called acute myelogenous leukemia or AML) in children is a cancer of the blood that starts in the bone marrow and spreads to the bloodstream. It is more common in adults, but each year approximately 730 new cases of AML are diagnosed in children (age 0-19) in the United States.

Leukemia begins in the bone marrow. Bone marrow is the spongy tissue located inside the bones, where blood cells are made. Leukemia starts when a single, young white blood cell, called a “blast” develops a series of mutations that allow it to multiply uncontrollably. Eventually, the blasts accumulate and crowd out normal cells in the bone marrow. They can also spill out into the bloodstream, and invade the lymph nodes, brain, skin, liver, kidney, ovaries, testes, and other organs. Occasionally they form a solid tumor called a “chloroma.”

News About Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) in Children was last modified: May 6th, 2015 by Geoff Duncan
Leland Christman, Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML)

Leland Christman, Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML)

11 Months Old at Diagnosis Leland was continuing to have ear infections. After the fourth infection in October 2013, he came down with a bad cold (cough, congestion, runny nose), and he just couldn’t seem to get rid of it. His pediatrician put him on... read more
Tania Lown-Hecht, Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

Tania Lown-Hecht, Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

16 Years Old at Diagnosis The summer before I was diagnosed with cancer, I was in the mountains teaching backpacking and wilderness skills to children, many of them from disadvantaged backgrounds. At 16, I had spent the last ten summers exploring the Sierra Nevada... read more
Samantha McCullough, Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML)

Samantha McCullough, Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML)

2 Years Old at Diagnosis Samantha, an easy-going, fun-loving two and a half year old, had a round bruise on her cheek that lasted for two weeks. Then came small spots of blood on her pillow from nosebleeds. Those developed into even bigger spots. Finally, a fever... read more

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