Ewing Sarcoma in Children



About Ewing Sarcoma

Ewing sarcoma in children is the second most common bone cancer in children. It occurs most frequently in the long bones of the legs or arms, the pelvis, chest wall, spine and the skull. Ewing sarcoma can also begin in the soft tissues and not involve bone. This disease most often occurs in adolescents, with nearly half of cases arising between the ages of 10 and 20. It is somewhat more common in males than in females.

The “Ewing family of tumors” includes Ewing sarcoma, atypical Ewing sarcoma, and peripheral primitive neuroectodermal (PNET) of bone or soft tissue, and they are all treated in the same manner. A chromosomal mutation can be identified in the tumor cells of the Ewing family of tumors. The chromosomal mutation is not part of the genetic make-up of the person with the tumor, it is only in the tumor cells; the tumor is not inherited. The cause of Ewing family of tumors is not yet known but it is believed this mutation plays an important role.

News About Ewing Sarcoma

Ewing Sarcoma in Children was last modified: April 21st, 2015 by Geoff Duncan
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