Katherine Minson, M.D. is a board-certified pediatric hematologist-oncologist and Medical Director at Parexel with experience in academic clinical research and preclinical drug development. She received her MD from the Medical University of South Carolina, completed a pediatric residency at Vanderbilt University, and her subspecialty training at the University of Colorado Denver. After completion of fellowship, she served on the faculty at Emory University for four years. During this time, she maintained a clinical practice focused on the care of children with cancer and blood disorders, including benign hematology, solid tumors, hematologic malignancies, immunohematology, and bone marrow transplant. Her specific area of expertise is in hematologic malignancies including acute leukemias, chronic myeloid leukemia, non-Hodgkin and Hodgkin lymphoma, and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) and has directly provided care for patients undergoing cellular therapies such as CAR-T. She served as an investigator for Children’s Oncology Group phase II/III trials. 

Dr. Minson also spent six years as a basic/translational researcher focused on pre-clinical drug development of small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) of the TAM (TYRO3/AXL/MERTK) family and has extensive experience with in vitro biochemical and functional assays and patient-derived xenograft models of non-small cell lung cancer, melanoma, and acute leukemias (lymphoid and myeloid). Her work formed the basis for IND-approval of a molecule currently in phase I clinical trials. Prior to joining Parexel her focus was on identification of resistance networks and combination TKI therapy. 

Dr. Minson joined Parexel in June 2019 and since that time has worked on a variety of clinical trials including phase I-IV spanning the breadth of liquid and solid tumor indications. She is a member of the phase I/rare tumor and hematology therapeutic area sections within the overall Hematology/Oncology franchise and is actively involved in the Pediatric and Cell and Gene Therapy working groups.  

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